Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

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Several doctors and dietitians recommend a Mediterranean diet meal plan
for preventing disease and keep people healthy for longer. The
The mediterranean diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and
it includes less dairy and meat than a usual Western diet.

What is the Mediterranean diet?

Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

A Mediterranean diet involves fresh products and few healthful fats
& oils. Following a Mediterranean diet means you will eat in the way
that the people in the Mediterranean area ate traditionally.

A traditional diet from the Mediterranean region includes a beautiful
portion of fresh produce, whole grains, and legumes and few healthful
fats and fish.

The general guidelines of the diet recommend that people should eat:

A wide variety of vegetables, whole grains, and fruits

Healthful fats like nuts, seeds, and olive oil

Moderate amounts of dairy & fish

Small white meat and red meat

Some eggs

Red wine in moderation

Red wine

The American Heart Association note that the average Mediterranean
diet contains a higher percentage of calories from fat. Though more than
half of the calories from fat come from monounsaturated fats like olive
oil, the diet cannot be right for people who want to limit their fat
intake.

Building a meal plan

Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan

The Mediterranean diet puts a high concentrate on plant foods than
several other diets. It is common for vegetables, grains, and legumes to
make up a meal.

People following the diet usually cook these foods
using healthy fats like olive oil and add plenty of flavorful spices.

Meals can include little portions of fish, meat, and eggs. Water and
sparkling waters are common drink choices and moderate amounts of red
wine.

People avoid the following foods on a Mediterranean diet:

refined grains like white pasta, white bread, and pizza dough containing white flour

refined oils, which include canola oil and soybean oil

foods with added sugars like pastries, candies, and sodas

hot dogs, deli meats, and different processed meats

processed and packaged foods

How to do Mediterranean Diet Meal Prep in a Week:

Meal prep

Make the Brussels Sprouts Salad with Chickpeas for lunch during your
busy work week.

Store them in air-tight meal-prep containers for keeping
fresh. On Day three, cook a double batch of Basic Quinoa when making
dinner and save leftover quinoa in a big air-tight glass container.

You will use extra quinoa for the Mediterranean Chickpea Quinoa Bowl
recipe on Day four. Any quinoa spare after that can be divided out into
individual servings and frozen for future usage.

If you’ve extra time to spare and need to get ahead, even more, you can peel and cut carrots
for snacks for the week and make the red-pepper sauce for your
Mediterranean Chickpea Quinoa Bowl on the 4th Day.

Day 1

Breakfast (219 calories): 1 serving Rainbow Frittata

Rainbow Frittata

A.M. Snack (62 calories): 1 medium orange

Lunch (374 calories): 1 serving Green Salad with also Pita Bread and Hummus

P.M. Snack (126 calories): 1 cup raspberries, and also 1/4 cup whole-milk Greek yogurt

Dinner (442 calories): One serving Dijon Salmon with some Green Bean Pilaf

Totals: 1,222 calories, 68 grams protein, 114 grams carbohydrates, 29 grams fiber, 58 g fat, 1,615 mg sodium

Day 2

Breakfast (287 calories): 1 serving Muesli with Raspberries

A.M. Snack (30 calories): 1 plum

Lunch (337 calories): 1 serving Brussels Sprouts Salad with Chickpeas

P.M. Snack (102 calories): 2 Tbsp. hummus, 2 medium carrots

Dinner (479 calories): 1 serving Linguine with Creamy Mushroom SauceCreamy Mushroom Sauce

Totals: 1,235 calories, 45 grams protein, 165 grams carbohydrates, 39 grams fiber, 48 grams fat, 1,059 mg sodium

Day 3

Breakfast (252 calories): 1 serving Fig and also Ricotta Toast

A.M. Snack (61 calories): 2 plums and whole milk Greek yogurt

whole-milk Greek yogurt

Lunch (337 calories): 1 serving Brussels Sprouts Salad with Crispy Chickpeas

P.M. Snack (126 calories): 1 cup raspberries, 1/4 cup

 

Dinner (429 calories): one serving Cod in Tomato Cream Sauce and one cup Basic Quinoa

Daily Totals: 1,205 calories, 59 grams protein, 138 g carbohydrates, 33 g fiber, 47 g fat, 1,129 mg sodium

Day 4

Breakfast (291 calories): 1 serving Creamy Blueberry-Pecan Overnight Oats

A.M. Snack (62 calories): 1 medium orange

Lunch (337 calories): 1 serving Brussels Sprouts Salad with Crispy Chickpeas

Dinner (477 calories): 1 serving Mediterranean Chickpea Quinoa Bowl

Mediterranean Chickpea Quinoa Bowl

Totals: 1,227 calories, 36 grams protein, 159 grams carbohydrates, 32 grams fiber, 54-gram fat, 1,170 mg sodium

Day 5

Breakfast (287 calories): 1 serving Muesli with Raspberries

Muesli with Raspberries

A.M. Snack (31 calories): 1 plum

Lunch (337 calories): 1 serving Brussels Sprouts Salad with Crispy Chickpeas

P.M. Snack (62 calories): 1 medium orange

Dinner (491 calories): 2 cups Chicken, White Bean Soup, 1” thick slice baguette

Meal-Prep Advice: Save 1 1/2 cups of the Chicken & White Bean Soup for lunch on Day 6.

Daily Totals: 1,207 calories, 83 g protein, 153 g carbohydrates, 37 g fiber, 36 g fat, 1,081 mg sodium

Day 6

Breakfast (291 calories): 1 serving Creamy Blueberry-Pecan Overnight Oats

Creamy Blueberry-Pecan Overnight Oats

A.M. Snack (62 calories): 1 medium orange

Lunch (248 calories): 1 1/2 cups Chicken & White Bean Soup

P.M. Snack (129 calories): 3 Tbsp. hummus, 2 medium carrots

Dinner (491 calories): 1 serving Eggs in Tomato Sauce with Chickpeas & Spinach

Totals: 1,218 calories, 71-gram protein, 159-gram carbohydrates, 30-gram fiber, 38-gram fat, 1,633 milligrams sodium

Day 7

Breakfast (252 calories): 1 serving Fig & Ricotta Toast

A.M. Snack (94 calories): 1/2 cup raspberries, and also 1/4 cup whole-milk Greek Yogurt

Lunch (374 calories): 1 serving Green Salad with Pita Bread & Hummus

Green Salad with Pita Bread & Hummus

P.M. Snack (102 calories): 2 Tbsp. hummus, 2 medium carrots

Dinner (397 calories): 1 serving Slow-Cooker Mediterranean Chicken & Orzo, 1-inch thick slice baguette

Daily Totals: 1,218 calories, 69 g protein, 166 g carbohydrates, 32 g fiber, 36 g fat, 1,927 mg sodium

Conclusion

When you follow a Mediterranean diet then it involves making
long-term, and sustainable dietary changes. Honestly speaking, an
individual needs to aim for a diet that is enriched with natural foods,
vegetables, grains, and healthy fats. Anybody who finds that this diet
is not satisfying then they should talk to a dietitian. They will
recommend or suggest alternative foods to increase satiety.

 

Finally

Thank you for reading this article and I hope you pulled out some workable information that you can use to make your life easier and more productive.

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So have a great day and be on the lookout for more useful content from me.

Take care

Dr. Charles

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